Student’s school experience warped around unique schedule

Napat ’21 pays close attention to his AP Chemistry class. Napat has used zoom to attend his classes all throughout the school year.

Most people associate the word nocturnal with creatures of the night. However, Napat Sinthucharoen ‘21 has redefined the word as he goes through his school day twelve hours opposite from the regular student. 

This monumental time difference means Napat starts his school day at 7:55 p.m. and finishes it at 3:24 a.m. While hard to adjust to at first, being in school at such a late time has become second nature for Napat.

“I’m fine with it by this point, I’m getting used to the time now,” Napat said.

While staying up late is a common occurrence for most teens, Napat’s schedule can seem daunting to even the most hardworking students. A certain level of diligence is required to make it through the school day.

“I think that you have to be very focused to get up that early every day. Teenagers are nocturnal but this example is taken to the extreme,” Noelle Hinrickson said.

Everything cannot go perfectly each day though, as the school day brings along its struggles as well. Whether it’s trying to stay awake or completing homework on-time, the online schedule can be unforgiving and demanding.

“Sometimes the assignment that’s due by midnight will be due by noon for me which is when I’m usually sleeping,” Napat said.

Others have noticed Napat’s hard work and can see it paying off in the classroom. 

“You can tell he’s tired by the end of the day, but he still turns in good work. He’s been utilizing canvas very well,” chemistry teacher Nicole Hebert said. 

At the top of most students and faculties minds is the threat of the school shutting down. With the constant reminder of in person classes requiring procedures in the form of masks and social distancing, students like Napat have nothing to fear as the transition of everything online will be nothing new to him.

“If everyone goes online then school is going to be a lot easier since the homework that I turn in online will be a lot easier to grade, and I won’t be alone in zoom class,” Napat said.

Napat’s time difference can even be turned into a positive asset as students will not be accustomed to hours of zoom calls a day. While the beginning of online school can be draining for most students, Napat will already be adjusted to getting through the day.

“Napat will be more prepared for the longevity of the zoom day,” Hebert said.

As of now, Napat is content with his new school life. While his experience is different from others, he doesn’t let that get in his way of fulfilling his student duties and helping protect him and his family from the pandemic.

“I wish I could be there, but I also feel lucky that I don’t need to face danger at home,” Napat said.

The Mount is produced by the students of Mount Michael Benedictine School.